Faculty

Lara Buchak  Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Princeton University). Her primary research interests are in decision, game, and rational choice theory. She also works in the philosophy of religion and in epistemology. She is the author of Risk and Rationality (OUP, 2013).

John Campbell (Equity Advisor)  Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor of Philosophy (D.Phil, University of Oxford). His main interests are in theory of meaning, metaphysics, and philosophy of psychology. He is currently working on the question whether consciousness, and in particular sensory awareness, plays any key role in our knowledge of our surroundings. He is also working more generally on causation in psychology. He is the author of Past, Space and Self (1994) and Reference and Consciousness (2002).

Timothy Clarke  Assistant Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Yale University). His research interests are in ancient Greek philosophy, particularly metaphysics, epistemology, and natural philosophy. His recent work includes the articles ‘The Argument from Relatives’ (Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 2012) and 'Aristotle and the Ancient Puzzle about Coming to Be’ (Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, 2015). He is currently completing a book on Aristotle’s response to Parmenides.

Joshua Cohen  Distinguished Senior Fellow (Ph.D., Harvard University). A specialist in political philosophy, he has written extensively on issues of democratic theory, freedom of expression, religious freedom, political equality, and global justice. His recent books include Philosophy, Politics, Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2009); Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals (Oxford University Press, 2010); and The Arc of the Moral Universe and Other Essays (Harvard University Press, 2011). He is on the faculty at Apple University and will spend one day each week at Berkeley as Distinguished Senior Fellow at the School of Law, the Department of Philosophy, and the Department of Political Science, starting July 1, 2015.

Tim Crockett  Lecturer (Ph.D., UC Berkeley). His area of specialization is early modern (17th and 18th century) philosophy. His primary areas of interest are 17th century metaphysics and epistemology, and the ways in which changes in science informed the philosophical views of early modern thinkers. He is also interested in medieval philosophy, especially the philosophical works of Augustine. His recent published works focus on Descartes’s and Leibniz’s metaphysics.

Shamik Dasgupta  Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., New York University). He works primarily in metaphysics and the philosophy of science, with additional research interests in epistemology and ethics. Please visit his website for further details.

Hannah Ginsborg (Chair)  Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Harvard University). She works on Kant and on contemporary issues in the theory of meaning and the philosophy of mind, in particular rule-following, concept-possession and the content of perceptual experience. Her current research focusses primarily on the normativity of meaning and content. She recently published The Normativity of Nature: Essays on Kant’s Critique of Judgement (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015).

Wesley H. Holliday  Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Stanford University). His recent research is mainly in philosophical logic, especially modal logic, intuitionistic logic, epistemic logic and epistemology, logic and natural language, and logic and probability.

Katharina Kaiser  Continuing Lecturer (Magister Artium, Universität Hamburg). She studied Philosophy, German Literature, and Physics at the University of Hamburg, where she also worked as a Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin in the Department of Philosophy after receiving her degree. Her current research and teaching interests extend to a range of topics in the history of philosophy (especially in the German tradition), aesthetics, literary modernism, and art.

Arpy Khatchirian   Lecturer (PhD, UC Berkeley; B.A., Rutgers University). I work in the philosophy of language, the philosophy of mind, and related areas in metaphysics and epistemology. My interests include the epistemology of language, truth, deflationism, and indeterminacy. I also maintain an active interest in the history of analytic philosophy.

Niko Kolodny (Undergraduate Advisor)  Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of California–Berkeley). His main interests are in moral and political philosophy. His publications include “Rule Over None” (Philosophy and Public Affairs, 2014), “Why Be Rational?” (Mind, 2005), “Love as Valuing a Relationship” (The Philosophical Review, 2003),

Geoffrey Lee  Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., New York University). His main areas of research interest are philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and the foundations of cognitive science and neuroscience.

John MacFarlane (Graduate Advisor)  Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh). His primary research interests lie in the philosophy of language, philosophical logic, and related issues in metaphysics and epistemology; he also maintains a secondary interest in ancient philosophy. He is the author of Assessment Sensitivity: Relative Truth and Its Applications (Oxford, 2014) and numerous articles.

Paolo Mancosu (On Leave)  Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., Stanford University). His interests lie in the philosophy of mathematics and its history, in philosophy of logic, and in mathematical logic. His written work is currently focused upon neologicism and the philosophy of mathematical practice. He has recently published “Infini, logique, géomètrie” (Vrin, Paris, 2015) and “Zhivago’s Secret Journey” (Hoover Press, Stanford, 2016). His forthcoming book “Abstraction and Infinity” will be published by Oxford University Press.

Michael Martin (On Leave)  Mills Adjunct Professor of Philosophy (D.Phil., University of Oxford). His main interests lie in the philosophy of mind and psychology. He is currently finishing a book on naïve realism in the theory of perception, provisionally titled Uncovering Appearances. He has also been working on the relation between emotions and phenomenal experience and the nature of pain. Recent publications include, “The Limits of Self-Awareness”, Philosophical Studies, 2004 and “On Being Alienated”, in Perceptual Experience (OUP), eds. Gendler & Hawthorne.

Véronique Munoz-Dardé (On Leave)  Mills Adjunct Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., European University Institute). Her main interests lie in moral and political philosophy. In recent years she has written articles on the importance of numbers in practical reasoning, on the political ideal of equality, on responsibility, and on distributive justice. During this period she has taught seminars on contractualism, equality, Hume’s Treatise, and values and practical reasoning. She is the author of La justice sociale (2001), and is currently finishing a book on the way that the political is personal, provisionally called Bound Together.

Alva Noë  Professor of Philosophy (B.A., Columbia University; B.Phil., University of Oxford; Ph.D., Harvard University). Alva Noë is a philosopher of mind whose research and teaching focus on perception and consciousness, as well as the theory of art (with special attention to dance as well as visual art). Other interests include Phenomenology, Wittgenstein, Kant, and the origins of analytic philosophy, as well as topics in the philosophies of baseball and biology. He is a weekly contributor to National Public Radio’s science blog 13.7: Cosmos and Culture (www.npr.org/13.7).

Kristin Primus  Assistant Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D. Princeton). She works primarily in early modern metaphysics and epistemology.

Kwong-loi Shun  Professor, Recalled (B. Phil., University of Oxford; Ph.D., Stanford University). Kwong-loi Shun specializes in Chinese philosophy and moral psychology, and has published textual and philological studies as well as philosophical discussions of themes in Confucian ethics. He is author of Mencius and Early Chinese Thought (Stanford UP, 1997) and co-editor of Confucian Ethics – A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy and Community (Cambridge UP, 2004), and has published numerous articles on Confucian thought. He is currently working on a book on later Confucianism, with focus on Zhu Xi, Wang Yangming and Dai Zhen, and a book on methodological issues in the transition from philological to philosophical studies of Chinese thought.

Hans Sluga  William and Trudy Ausfahl Professor of Philosophy (B. Phil.,University of Oxford). He has both systematic and historical interests in philosophy. Systematic: philosophy of logic, theory of meaning, epistemology; political philosophy. Historical: Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein; Nietzsche, Foucault. He is the author of Gottlob Frege, Heidegger’s Crisis, Wittgenstein, and Politics and the Search for the Common Good.

Barry Stroud  Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, Recalled (Ph.D., Harvard University). He works mainly in epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and language, and the history of modern philosophy. He is the author of Hume, The Significance of Philosophical Scepticism, The Quest for Reality, Engagement and Metaphysical Dissatisfaction, and three volumes of collected essays. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on Hume, Wittgenstein, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and parts of the history of modern philosophy.

R. Jay Wallace  Judy Chandler Webb Distinguished Chair for Innovative Teaching and Research (B. Phil., University of Oxford; Ph.D., Princeton University). His interests lie mainly in moral philosophy and the history of ethics. His research has focused on responsibility, moral psychology, and the theory of practical reason. Recently he has written on promising, normativity, constructivism, resentment, hypocrisy, love, regret and affirmation, and practical requirements. His publications include Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments (Harvard), Normativity and the Will (Oxford), and The View from Here (Oxford). During the past few years he has taught undergraduate courses on ethics, moral psychology, and free will and graduate seminars on promising, practical knowledge, future persons, and the moral nexus.

Daniel Warren  Associate Professor of Philosophy (M.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Harvard University). His work focuses on Kant and on the history and philosophy of science in the 17th and 18th centuries. Recent papers have concerned Kant and the apriority of space, Kant’s conception of things in themselves, and Kant’s dynamics. He teaches courses on introductory logic, bioethics, personal identity, and Kant; recent seminars have been about Leibniz, transcendental arguments, and self-knowledge.

Seth Yalcin  Associate Professor of Philosophy (Ph.D., MIT). He works mostly in the philosophy of language, but his research interests extend to issues in the philosophy of mind, metaphysics, formal epistemology, and linguistics.

Affiliated Faculty

Meir Dan-Cohen   Professor at the law school where he holds the Milo Reese Robbins Chair in Legal Ethics (LL.M., JSD, Yale University). His main interests are in legal, moral, and political philosophy, with a special emphasis on the relevance to these fields of our conceptions of the various actors, individual and collective, that occupy them. He is the author of Rights, Persons, and Organizations: A Legal Theory for Bureaucratic Society, (UC Press, 1986; 2nd Edition, Quid Pro Books, 2016); Harmful Thoughts: Essays on Law, Self, and Morality (Princeton UP, 2002); and Normative Subjects: Self and Collectivity in Morality and Law (Oxford UP, 2016).

G. R. F. (John) Ferrari  Professor of Classics (Ph.D. Cambridge University, Classics). Professor Ferrari teaches in the Classics department, where he specializes in ancient philosophy. His philosophic interests are in the areas of aesthetics, hermeneutics, and political thought. He has published primarily on Plato, with books on the Phaedrus and the Republic, and has collaborated on a new translation of the Republic.

Alison Gopnik  Professor of Psychology (D. Phil Oxford University). She is a professor in the psychology department and works on problems of causal knowledge and learning, intuitive theory formation, and “theory of mind.” Her work explores the relation between empirical work in cognitive development and classical philosophical problems in epistemology and philosophy of mind. She is coauthor of Words, Thoughts and Theories (MIT Press, 1997) and The Scientist in the Crib (Harper Collins, 2000).

Jodi Halpern  Associate Professor, School of Public Health (M.D., Ph.D., Yale University). She is Associate Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities in the School of Public Health/Joint Medical Program. She works mainly on emotions and the imagination, with a longstanding focus on empathy. She is the author of From Detached Concern to Empathy: Humanizing Medical Practice (Oxford University Press). Halpern recently received a Greenwall Faculty Scholar career development award to write about emotions and envisioning future well-being, and the impact of this on serious health decisions.

Kinch Hoekstra  Associate Professor of Political Science and Law (D.Phil., Oxford University). He specializes in the history of political, moral, and legal philosophy. He has written on ancient, renaissance, and early modern political thought, with a special focus on Thomas Hobbes. From 1996 to 2007, Hoekstra was a member of the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he also regularly taught graduate students in the Faculty of Classics and the Department of Politics and International Relations. During this same period, he was the Leveson Gower Fellow in Ancient and Modern Philosophy at Balliol College.

Christopher Kutz  C. William Maxeiner Distinguished Professor of Law (Ph.D., U.C. Berkeley; J.D., Yale University). He is a faculty member in the Law School’s program in Jurisprudence & Social Policy. He works mainly in moral, legal, and political philosophy, with a current focus on the ethics of war and peace, and the design of just institutions.. He is author of Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age (Cambridge University Press 2001), and his War and Democracy is forthcoming from Princeton University Press. He is director of the Kadish Center for Morality, Law and Public Affairs a the School of Law.

David Lieberman  James W. and Isabel Coffroth Professor of Jurisprudence, School of Law, and Professor of History (Ph.D., London University). He is a faculty member in the Law School’s program in Jurisprudence & Social Policy, which he chaired from 2000-04. He teaches courses on the history of legal and political theory, and on the relationships between academic jurisprudence and the social sciences. His own research focuses on the classical utilitarian tradition (including Bentham, James Mill and John Stuart Mill) and on the moral philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment (including Hume, Smith, Lord Kames and John Millar).

Tania Lombrozo  Associate Professor of Psychology (Ph.D., Harvard University). She is a faculty member in the psychology department, where she specializes in cognitive psychology. Her current research examines the structure and function of explanations, categories, and causal claims. In a second line of work, she studies moral reasoning. Her philosophical interests center on the philosophy of science, but also include issues in philosophy of biology, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, and moral philosophy.

Anthony A. Long  Irving Stone Professor of Literature Emeritus (Department of Classics) (Ph.D., University of London). His main field of teaching and research is ancient philosophy. He is editor of The Cambridge Companion to Early Greek Philosophy and his other books include Hellenistic Philosophy (University of California Press) and Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life (Oxford University Press).

Sara Magrin  Assistant Professor of Classics (PhD McGill, Philosophy). She is a faculty member in the department of classics, and she specializes in ancient philosophy. Her research focuses on ancient epistemology and psychology, and she has published on ancient skepticism and on Plotinus. She is working on a book tentatively titled With the Whole Soul: Plotinus on Animal and Human Forms of Cognition and Desire.

Line Mikkelsen  Associate Professor of Linguistics (Ph.D., U.C. Santa Cruz). Mikkelsen is a faculty member in the Linguistics Department who works on the syntax, semantics, and morphology of natural languages and the relations between these. She maintains an interest in philosophy of language and participates in the Bay Area Philosophy of Language Discussion Group. She is the author of Copular Clauses: Specification, Predication and Equation (2005, John Benjamins).

Stephen Palmer  Professor of the Graduate School (Ph.D., U.C. San Diego). He is a faculty member in the Psychology Department (in the Cognition, Brain and Behavior group) and has strong ties to the Cognitive Science program on campus. He works mainly on organizational issues in visual perception but also is interested in color. He is the author of Vision Science: Photons to Phenomenology (1999, MIT Press) and is currently writing a book about color.

Eric Rakowski  Edward C. Halbach Jr. Professor of Law (B.Phil., D.Phil., Oxford University; J.D., Harvard Law School). He is a law professor who works on questions of moral and political philosophy and bioethics, besides teaching and writing on federal tax issues and trust and estate law. He is the author of Equal Justice (Oxford University Press).

Sarah Song  Professor of Law and Associate Professor of Political Science (Ph.D., Political Science, Yale.) She is a faculty member in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at the Law School. She works in moral, political and legal philosophy with a current focus on the ethics and politics of migration and citizenship. She teaches courses in political and legal philosophy, the history of American political thought, and citizenship and immigration law.

John R. Steel  Professor of Mathematics (Ph.D., U.C. Berkeley). He is a professor in the mathematics department. Most of his work lies in set theory, and in particular in Gödel’s program for strengthening the set-theoretic foundation of mathematics through the addition of strong axioms of infinity. Broader philosophical issues concerning meaning and evidence for mathematical statements come to the fore here. Steel’s paper “Mathematics Needs New Axioms” (Bulletin of Symbolic Logic, vol. 6 (2000), 422-433) discusses Gödel’s program, with special attention to questions of meaning and evidence.

Emeriti

Janet Broughton  Professor Emerita (Ph.D., Princeton University). She retired in July of 2016. She is a scholar of 17th- and 18th-century philosophy, with a special interest in skepticism. She is author of Descartes’s Method of Doubt and, with John Carriero, co-editor of The Blackwell Companion to Descartes. Currently she is working on a Hume project.

Charles Chihara  Professor Emeritus (Ph.D., University of Washington). He has published many articles in his principal areas of interest: philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of logic. He has also published widely in the philosophy of science and confirmation theory, as well as on the philosophies of Wittgenstein, Russell, Quine, Goodman and Davidson. He is the author of Ontology and the Vicious Circle Principle (1973), Constructibility and Mathematical Existence (1990), The Worlds of Possibility: Model Realism and the Semantics of Modal Logic (1998), and A Structural Account of Mathematics (2004). He is now working on various problems in the philosophy of mathematics.

Alan Code  Professor Emeritus

Hubert Dreyfus  Professor Emeritus (Ph.D., Harvard). Dreyfus’ research interests bridged the analytic and Continental traditions in 20th century philosophy. His book, with Sean Kelly, All things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age, was a New York Times best-seller. The first volume of his selected papers, Skillful Coping, has been published by Oxford University Press. The second volume, Background Practices will be published this coming June, also from OUP. His book co-authored with Charles M. Taylor, Retrieving Realism, is now available. Hubert L. Dreyfus passed away on Saturday, April 22nd 2017.

John R. Searle  Willis S. and Marion Slusser Professor Emeritus of the Philosophy of Mind and Language (D. Phil., University of Oxford). His work ranges broadly over philosophical problems of mind and language. Recent books include The Mystery of Consciousness (1997), Mind, Language and Society: Philosophy in the Real World (1998), Rationality in Action (2001), Mind (2004), Liberté et Neurobiologie (2004), and Making the Social World: The Structure of Human Civilization (2010).

Bruce Vermazen  Professor Emeritus